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Prince Charles meets Native American environmental activists during Cop26 summit

Prince Charles meets Native American environmental activists during Cop26 summit

The Prince of Wales received a blessing of good energy after meeting with Native American environmental activists during the Cop26 summit in Glasgow this afternoon. 

The heir-to-the-throne, who is known as the Duke of Rothesay when north of the border, attended an indigenous listening session with CEOs at the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum. 

The session was designed to encourage the private sector to listen to the wisdom of the world’s indigenous people in order to address climate change

Charles, 72, met Tom Goldtooth, a climate activist and executive director of the Indigenous Environmental Network, who presented the Duke with a gift of plaited sweetgrass. 

The Prince of Wales received a blessing of good energy after meeting with Native American environmental activists during the Cop26 summit in Glasgow this afternoon

The Prince of Wales received a blessing of good energy after meeting with Native American environmental activists during the Cop26 summit in Glasgow this afternoon

The Prince of Wales received a blessing of good energy after meeting with Native American environmental activists during the Cop26 summit in Glasgow this afternoon

Charles, 72, met Tom Goldtooth, a climate activist and executive director of the Indigenous Environmental Network, who presented the Duke with a gift of plaited sweetgrass

Charles, 72, met Tom Goldtooth, a climate activist and executive director of the Indigenous Environmental Network, who presented the Duke with a gift of plaited sweetgrass

Charles, 72, met Tom Goldtooth, a climate activist and executive director of the Indigenous Environmental Network, who presented the Duke with a gift of plaited sweetgrass

The plant is commonly used for healing or ritual purposes and braided sweetgrass is thought to attract good spirits, positive energies and is used a tool to cleanse people’s auras.  

Charles spent his morning at the art gallery meeting  Hollywood and fashion royalty including Leonardo DiCaprio and Stella McCartney, who are both keen environmental campaigners.  

Charles has been front and centre throughout the conference, alongside other senior members of the royal family, including the Duchess of Cornwall, Prince William and Kate Middleton.  

On Monday Charles, William and Kate hosted a royal reception at the popular Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow, a short distance from where the climate summit is being held. 

The heir-to-the-throne, who is known as the Duke of Rothesay when north of the border, attended an indigenous listening session is pictured meeting indigenous people at the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum

The heir-to-the-throne, who is known as the Duke of Rothesay when north of the border, attended an indigenous listening session is pictured meeting indigenous people at the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum

The heir-to-the-throne, who is known as the Duke of Rothesay when north of the border, attended an indigenous listening session is pictured meeting indigenous people at the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum

The session was designed to encourage the private sector to listen to the wisdom of the world's indigenous people in order to address climate change

The session was designed to encourage the private sector to listen to the wisdom of the world's indigenous people in order to address climate change

The session was designed to encourage the private sector to listen to the wisdom of the world’s indigenous people in order to address climate change

The Duke – who flew from Rome’s  to the conference on Sunday- demanded action on climate change at the G20 summit as he warned world leaders they have an ‘overwhelming responsibility to generations yet unborn.  

He said the UN climate change conference which opened in Glasgow on Sunday is ‘quite literally’ the ‘last chance saloon’ to save the planet. 

Whilst recognising that urgent action on climate change is crucial, the prince told G20 leaders in Rome: ‘I am, at last, sensing a change in attitudes and the build-up of positive momentum.’

The heir to the throne emphasised that the world leaders have an ‘overwhelming responsibility to generations yet unborn’.

He told the G20 politicians: ‘It is impossible not to hear the despairing voices of young people who see you as the stewards of the planet, holding the viability of their future in your hands’.

Prince Charles looked delighted today as he met with Leonardo DiCpario and Stella McCartney at COP26 in Glasgow.

Prince Charles looked delighted today as he met with Leonardo DiCpario and Stella McCartney at COP26 in Glasgow.

Prince Charles looked delighted today as he met with Leonardo DiCpario and Stella McCartney at COP26 in Glasgow.

Royalty meets Hollywood royalty! The Prince of Wales shakes hands with Leonardo DiCaprio today

Royalty meets Hollywood royalty! The Prince of Wales shakes hands with Leonardo DiCaprio today

Royalty meets Hollywood royalty! The Prince of Wales shakes hands with Leonardo DiCaprio today

Charles added: ‘Cop 26 begins in Glasgow on Sunday and quite literally it is the last chance saloon.

‘We must now translate fine words into still finer actions and as the enormity of the climate challenge dominates people’s conversations from newsrooms to living rooms.

‘And as the future of humanity and nature herself are at stake it is surely time to set aside our differences and grasp this unique opportunity to launch a substantial green recovery by putting the global economy on a confident sustainable trajectory and thus save our planet.’ 

After rubbing shoulders with celebrities yesterday, the Prince met with  the CEOs of global companies awarded the Terra Carta Seal.

The Terra Carta Seal, designed by Sir Jony Ive, recognises global companies which are driving innovation and demonstrating their commitment to genuinely sustainable markets. 

It  was presented at today’s inaugural awards to 45 companies that have committed to accelerating action over the next decade to help limit global heating to 1.5 C by 2050.

Source: dailymail

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