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Duke of Edinburgh would have been ’embarrassed’ by Queen’s ‘deeply personal’ speech at COP26 summit

Duke of Edinburgh would have been ’embarrassed’ by Queen’s ‘deeply personal’ speech at COP26 summit

Prince Philip would have been ’embarrassed’ by the Queen‘s ‘deeply personal’ speech  praising his dedication to the environment  representatives at the COP26 summit tonight, the late Duke’s biographer has claimed.

Her Majesty, 95, who was forced to miss the conference after her overnight stay in hospital last month, told leaders via video how the ‘impact of the environment on human progress was a cause ‘close to the heart of my dear late husband’. 

Addressing Government representatives at the reception for the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, she recalled an academic gathering in 1969 in which Philip warned how ‘critical’ it was to address climate change.  

Speaking exclusively to FEMAIL, royal biographer Robert Jobson, who penned Prince Philip’s Century, called the speech ‘wonderful’, but says Philip, who died aged 99 in April, would have been left red-faced by the public show of affection. 

The Queen told leaders via video how the 'impact of the environment on human progress was a cause 'close to the heart of my dear late husband' in her 'deeply personal' speech to representatives at the COP26 summit tonight

The Queen told leaders via video how the 'impact of the environment on human progress was a cause 'close to the heart of my dear late husband' in her 'deeply personal' speech to representatives at the COP26 summit tonight

 The Queen told leaders via video how the ‘impact of the environment on human progress was a cause ‘close to the heart of my dear late husband’ in her ‘deeply personal’ speech to representatives at the COP26 summit tonight

‘I thought it was a wonderful, deeply personal touch. A tribute to a man of vision, that Prince Philip was. He would have been embarrassed. But it shows how rightly proud she was of him,’ he explained.

‘He was a great champion for nature and the environment. A farsighted man who did so much to help preserve endangered species on this planet through his creation of the World Wildlife Fund for Nature of which he was a driving force in creating.’ 

Following the Duke’s death earlier this year, royal biographer Nigel Cawthorne, claimed that ‘Prince Philip himself would not countenance public displays of affection’ – but that the royals’ outpouring of grief for Prince Philip had signalled a shift in the monarchy’s approach to emotion.  

‘It is significant that not only Charles but even the Queen appears to have broken this rule’, he told FEMAIL at the time.

Speaking to Femail, he said: 'I thought it was a wonderful, deeply personal touch. A tribute to a man of vision, that Prince Philip was'. The pair are pictured in the quadrangle of Windsor Castle in September 2020

Speaking to Femail, he said: 'I thought it was a wonderful, deeply personal touch. A tribute to a man of vision, that Prince Philip was'. The pair are pictured in the quadrangle of Windsor Castle in September 2020

Speaking to Femail, he said: ‘I thought it was a wonderful, deeply personal touch. A tribute to a man of vision, that Prince Philip was’. The pair are pictured in the quadrangle of Windsor Castle in September 2020

‘The stiff upper lip is no longer, and under Charles’ increased influence it is likely to be phased out as out of tune with the times.’ 

In her most personal speech to date, the monarch said this evening: ‘I am delighted to welcome you all to the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference; and it is perhaps fitting that you have come together in Glasgow, once a heartland of the industrial revolution, but now a place to address climate change. 

‘This is a duty I am especially happy to discharge, as the impact of the environment on human progress was a subject close to the heart of my dear late husband, Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh. 

‘I remember well that in 1969, he told an academic gathering: ‘If the world pollution situation is not critical at the moment, it is as certain as anything can be, that the situation will become increasingly intolerable within a very short time … If we fail to cope with this challenge, all the other problems will pale into insignificance.’  

Government representatives and world leaders have been tackling the issue of climate change at the COP26 summit in Glasgow

Government representatives and world leaders have been tackling the issue of climate change at the COP26 summit in Glasgow

Government representatives and world leaders have been tackling the issue of climate change at the COP26 summit in Glasgow

Her Majesty described how personally invested she was in the matter and said she ‘could not be more proud’ of her later husband, her eldest son Charles and her grandson William in their efforts to ‘protect our fragile planet’. 

She continued: ‘It is a source of great pride to me that the leading role my husband played in encouraging people to protect our fragile planet, lives on through the work of our eldest son Charles and his eldest son William. 

‘I could not be more proud of them. Indeed, I have drawn great comfort and inspiration from the relentless enthusiasm of people of all ages – especially the young – in calling for everyone to play their part.’ 

The Queen’s full speech to world leaders at COP26

‘Thank you, Prime Minister Holness, for your kind words of introduction. I am delighted to welcome you all to the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference; and it is perhaps fitting that you have come together in Glasgow, once a heartland of the industrial revolution, but now a place to address climate change. 

‘This is a duty I am especially happy to discharge, as the impact of the environment on human progress was a subject close to the heart of my dear late husband, Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh. 

‘I remember well that in 1969, he told an academic gathering: ‘If the world pollution situation is not critical at the moment, it is as certain as anything can be, that the situation will become increasingly intolerable within a very short time … If we fail to cope with this challenge, all the other problems will pale into insignificance.’

 ‘It is a source of great pride to me that the leading role my husband played in encouraging people to protect our fragile planet, lives on through the work of our eldest son Charles and his eldest son William. I could not be more proud of them. Indeed, I have drawn great comfort and inspiration from the relentless enthusiasm of people of all ages – especially the young – in calling for everyone to play their part.

‘In the coming days, the world has the chance to join in the shared objective of creating a safer, stabler future for our people and for the planet on which we depend. 

‘None of us underestimates the challenges ahead: but history has shown that when nations come together in common cause, there is always room for hope. Working side by side, we have the ability to solve the most insurmountable problems and to triumph over the greatest of adversities.

 ‘For more than seventy years, I have been lucky to meet and to know many of the world’s great leaders. And I have perhaps come to understand a little about what made them special.

‘It has sometimes been observed that what leaders do for their people today is government and politics. But what they do for the people of tomorrow — that is statesmanship. I, for one, hope that this conference will be one of those rare occasions where everyone will have the chance to rise above the politics of the moment, and achieve true statesmanship. 

‘It is the hope of many that the legacy of this summit – written in history books yet to be printed – will describe you as the leaders who did not pass up the opportunity; and that you answered the call of those future generations. That you left this conference as a community of nations with a determination, a desire, and a plan, to address the impact of climate change; and to recognise that the time for words has now moved to the time for action.

‘Of course, the benefits of such actions will not be there to enjoy for all of us here today: we none of us will live forever. But we are doing this not for ourselves but for our children and our children’s children, and those who will follow in their footsteps. And so, I wish you every good fortune in this significant endeavour. ‘

 

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Yesterday Charles, 72, – who flew from Rome’s G20 summit to the conference today – demanded action on climate change as he warned world leaders they have an ‘overwhelming responsibility to generations yet unborn.  

He said the UN climate change conference which opened in Glasgow on Sunday is ‘quite literally’ the ‘last chance saloon’ to save the planet. 

Whilst recognising that urgent action on climate change is crucial, the prince told G20 leaders in Rome: ‘I am, at last, sensing a change in attitudes and the build-up of positive momentum.’

The heir to the throne emphasised that the world leaders have an ‘overwhelming responsibility to generations yet unborn’.

He told the G20 politicians: ‘It is impossible not to hear the despairing voices of young people who see you as the stewards of the planet, holding the viability of their future in your hands’.

Charles added: ‘Cop 26 begins in Glasgow on Sunday and quite literally it is the last chance saloon.

‘We must now translate fine words into still finer actions and as the enormity of the climate challenge dominates people’s conversations from newsrooms to living rooms.

‘And as the future of humanity and nature herself are at stake it is surely time to set aside our differences and grasp this unique opportunity to launch a substantial green recovery by putting the global economy on a confident sustainable trajectory and thus save our planet.’    

Elsewhere in her speech, Her Majesty told leaders ‘earn a place in history’ and ‘answer the call of those future generations’, ‘to rise above the politics of the moment, and achieve true statesmanship’. 

 She went on to say that ‘none of us will live forever’ and ‘we are doing this not for ourselves but for our children and our children’s children, and those who will follow in their footsteps’ as she urged leaders to reach decisive COP climate change deals. 

Boris Johnson told world leaders at the start of the COP26 summit that they can no longer afford to delay taking major action to address climate change as he warned ‘the longer we fail to act, the worse it gets’. 

This evening Prince Charles, Prince William and Kate Middleton hosted a royal reception at the popular Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow, a short distance from where the climate summit was being held.

Kate, 39, looked the picture of poise in a blue coat dress and navy heels as she walked alongside Prince William in a dapper suit at the arrival.

Wearing her hair back in a low bun, the Duchess opted for a glamorous make-up look for the ceremony tonight where she was hosted Prince Charles, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall and Boris Johnson as well as key members of the Sustainable Markets Initiative and the Winners and Finalists of the first Earthshot Prize Awards.

Her custom dress came from Eponine’s SS20 collection and made from a double wool crepe fabric, the price is available on application but similar dresses cost around $3,278.

Meanwhile, Camilla, 74, opted for a teal Bruce Oldfield featuring buttons recycled from another outfit.

William and Kate’s appearance comes just hours after royal couple, both 39, visited Alexandra Park Sports Hub in Dennistoun to meet with Scouts from and learn more about the group’s’ #PromiseToThePlanet campaign.

The event marks the first engagement for the couple since they arrived in the Scottish city for the COP26 conference which has brought world leaders together to discuss urgent action on climate change.

The Royal Family have long had links with conservation and Prince Philip, who was lifelong ornithology enthusiast, has previously said he learned the principles of conservation from farming. 

In 2020 Prince William took over as Patron for the British Trust for Ornithology, which aims to ensure wildlife is preserved for generations to come, whilst also working to promote the benefits of the natural world on our health and wellbeing.  

His interest was first sparked in 1956 while travelling in the Royal Yacht Britannia between New Zealand and Antarctica, where the Duke began to identify and photograph the seabirds native to the region.    

Source: dailymail

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